Rows of greens grow on the front yard of Gary Henderson's house. He's one of a handful of homeowners in Orlando, Fla., who've given up their lawn to Fleet Farming. Once "you realize that you can eat your lawn, I think it makes a whole lot of sense," Henderson says.Rows of greens grow in the front yard of Gary Henderson’s house. He’s one of a handful of homeowners in Orlando, Fla., who’ve given up their lawn to Fleet Farming. Once “you realize that you can eat your lawn, I think it makes a whole lot of sense,” Henderson says.

In Florida, homeowners have a propensity for landscaping. They take great pride in the green carpet of grass in front of their homes. But one Florida man is working on a project that’s turning his neighbors’ lawns into working farms.

Chris Castro has an obsession — turning the perfectly manicured lawns in his Orlando neighborhood into mini-farms.

“The amount of interest in Orlando is incredibly surprising,” Castro says.

Surprising because he’s asking Floridians to hand over a good chunk of their precious yards to volunteers who plant gardens full of produce. His program is called Fleet Farming, and it’s starting off small, with 10 of these yard farms. Most of them sit smack in the middle of the front yard.

At the time this article was published, more than 300 Floridians were on the waiting list to have Fleet Farming plant their yards with produce. Read More...

An excerpt from NPR

May 15, 2016

By: Catherine Welch